Miglia Quadrato The Miglia Quadrato is a motoring event. It takes the form of a treasure hunt which takes entrants to various parts of the City of London, where they are challenged to find the answers to questions. These clues are not cryptic but may be observationally challenging. For some the event is a social activity and leads entrants on a historical and educational tour (combined with a "quiz") of some of the less visible “features” of the City. For others, it is highly competitive: an attempt to answer as many clues as possible in a limited time. The event takes place at night, for five hours between midnight and five in the morning (Saturday/Sunday). There is absolutely no route. Competitors are provide with a sheet having sixty references that may be plotted on a 1:10000 map pin-pointing a “search” area of 10 metres square. There are no cryptic clues – each question may be answered from permanent features of the City. For example, Blue Plaques, architect stones, inscriptions on monuments, etc. The sheet is handed to competitors at midnight and they will spend twenty minutes or more plotting these on the map. They then decide their own path between locations. The clues are categorised as easy, medium, or difficult and this will affect how each team chooses their order of tackling the clues. The event takes place entirely on the streets, footpaths, and public spaces of the City of London. The organisers take every care to avoid inhabited areas and sensitive areas (such as the hospital) and to ensure residents and other users of the City are not disturbed or affected. Only publicly accessible areas are used. It is noteworthy that the event was originally created in 1957/1958 in the wake of the Suez crisis and fuel rationing. This had brought all motor competition to a halt and the Miglia was conceived as a way to enable a form of motoring event while minimising fuel usage. Indeed, the mileage is such that even a Lamborghini would be unlikely to use a gallon of petrol! The format of the event is unique and has earned a reputation for providing a challenging and enjoyable night, so much so that teams travel from all over the United Kingdom (and even further afield) to compete. The reputation of the event is spread by word of mouth – our regular competitors are notable for their enthusiasm. The nature of the City means the numbers involved must be limited and ideally the event would see an entry of around a hundred teams. The family car is ideally suited to he event as no benefit accrues from performance. Of particular satisfaction is the entry of a few vintage or veteran vehicles (such as those from the Royal College of Science/Royal School of Mines). These certainly symbolise the spirit of the event. Recently, more such entries have boosted the numbers resulting in much admiration at the start. It is worth quoting the Motor Sports Association definition of a Treasure Hunt: An event involving the solving of certain problems in which the use of a car is merely incidental as a means of transport and the skill or experience of a driver plays no part.  The skill element of the event is in map reading and accurately identifying the clue locations at which answers may be found – easy ones will be obvious to all, but the difficult ones may escape those who do not peruse the area with sufficient care! Selection of clues takes into account traffic and parking regulations/restrictions and the safety of contestants is paramount. Indeed, the key to success is in accurate plotting. Some of the clues (notably those classified as difficult) will tax the crews’ observational skills. But the clues are straightforward, there are no catches. Many simply require completion of quoted text or finding an inscribed date (or similar). There is no ambiguity – when an answer has been found it will be obvious that it is the required one. Local knowledge has little bearing – indeed, some who felt they knew the City fare no better than other novices. Of course, selection of a route and navigation between the chosen points is a challenge (especially given one way streets, turn prohibitions, etc.) but is part of the event that both frustrates and gives it its unique character.  Running at night, there is the fun of searching by torchlight. The beam of a torch may linger on an inscription or pass close by. There is a thrill at finding an answer, especially so if other teams are nearby and you are able to slip away without revealing what you found! Clues range from the blatantly obvious, such as blue plaques (you still need to have plotted carefully) to sometimes obscured and faded foundation stones. Statues may bear a discreet name of the sculptor or founder, often tucked away in some nook or cranny. The time can flash by and then you are headed to the finish, where after a short wait, provisional results will show how you fared against others. There are rivalries between teams from the same club or company that are equal to the battle at the head of the field. For those of a braver disposition there is a category for teams of just two (not recommended for your first outing). Should you wish to learn more about the techniques of plotting and clue finding please download our Newcomers’ Guide here. Details and regulations for the next event can be found elsewhere on the site. Our other annual event (the Londinium Pedo) has run since 1972. Neither could continue without the approval of both the City authorities and the City of London Police – to both of whom, we are most grateful. The present organisers have been running both events since 1971 and this continuity ensures there is no impact upon other City users. We enjoy a very good relationship with the City of London Police who have offered advice over the years. We have run this event  for over fifty years and are proud that the Police have always considered it a well-organised event.
Miglia Quadrato The Miglia Quadrato is a motoring event. It takes the form of a treasure hunt which takes entrants to various parts of the City of London, where they are challenged to find the answers to questions. These clues are not cryptic but may be observationally challenging. For some the event is a social activity and leads entrants on a historical and educational tour (combined with a "quiz") of some of the less visible “features” of the City. For others, it is highly competitive: an attempt to answer as many clues as possible in a limited time. The event takes place at night, for five hours between midnight and five in the morning (Saturday/Sunday). There is absolutely no route. Competitors are provide with a sheet having sixty references that may be plotted on a 1:10000 map pin-pointing a “search” area of 10 metres square. There are no cryptic clues – each question may be answered from permanent features of the City. For example, Blue Plaques, architect stones, inscriptions on monuments, etc. The sheet is handed to competitors at midnight and they will spend twenty minutes or more plotting these on the map. They then decide their own path between locations. The clues are categorised as easy, medium, or difficult and this will affect how each team chooses their order of tackling the clues. The event takes place entirely on the streets, footpaths, and public spaces of the City of London. The organisers take every care to avoid inhabited areas and sensitive areas (such as the hospital) and to ensure residents and other users of the City are not disturbed or affected. Only publicly accessible areas are used. It is noteworthy that the event was originally created in 1957/1958 in the wake of the Suez crisis and fuel rationing. This had brought all motor competition to a halt and the Miglia was conceived as a way to enable a form of motoring event while minimising fuel usage. Indeed, the mileage is such that even a Lamborghini would be unlikely to use a gallon of petrol! The format of the event is unique and has earned a reputation for providing a challenging and enjoyable night, so much so that teams travel from all over the United Kingdom (and even further afield) to compete. The reputation of the event is spread by word of mouth – our regular competitors are notable for their enthusiasm. The nature of the City means the numbers involved must be limited and ideally the event would see an entry of around a hundred teams. The family car is ideally suited to he event as no benefit accrues from performance. Of particular satisfaction is the entry of a few vintage or veteran vehicles (such as those from the Royal College of Science/Royal School of Mines). These certainly symbolise the spirit of the event. Recently, more such entries have boosted the numbers resulting in much admiration at the start. It is worth quoting the Motor Sports Association definition of a Treasure Hunt: An event involving the solving of certain problems in which the use of a car is merely incidental as a means of transport and the skill or experience of a driver plays no part.  The skill element of the event is in map reading and accurately identifying the clue locations at which answers may be found – easy ones will be obvious to all, but the difficult ones may escape those who do not peruse the area with sufficient care! Selection of clues takes into account traffic and parking regulations/restrictions and the safety of contestants is paramount. Indeed, the key to success is in accurate plotting. Some of the clues (notably those classified as difficult) will tax the crews’ observational skills. But the clues are straightforward, there are no catches. Many simply require completion of quoted text or finding an inscribed date (or similar). There is no ambiguity – when an answer has been found it will be obvious that it is the required one. Local knowledge has little bearing – indeed, some who felt they knew the City fare no better than other novices. Of course, selection of a route and navigation between the chosen points is a challenge (especially given one way streets, turn prohibitions, etc.) but is part of the event that both frustrates and gives it its unique character.  Running at night, there is the fun of searching by torchlight. The beam of a torch may linger on an inscription or pass close by. There is a thrill at finding an answer, especially so if other teams are nearby and you are able to slip away without revealing what you found! Clues range from the blatantly obvious, such as blue plaques (you still need to have plotted carefully) to sometimes obscured and faded foundation stones. Statues may bear a discreet name of the sculptor or founder, often tucked away in some nook or cranny. The time can flash by and then you are headed to the finish, where after a short wait, provisional results will show how you fared against others. There are rivalries between teams from the same club or company that are equal to the battle at the head of the field. For those of a braver disposition there is a category for teams of just two (not recommended for your first outing). Should you wish to learn more about the techniques of plotting and clue finding please download our Newcomers’ Guide here. Details and regulations for the next event can be found elsewhere on the site. Our other annual event (the Londinium Pedo) has run since 1972. Neither could continue without the approval of both the City authorities and the City of London Police – to both of whom, we are most grateful. The present organisers have been running both events since 1971 and this continuity ensures there is no impact upon other City users. We enjoy a very good relationship with the City of London Police who have offered advice over the years. We have run this event  for over fifty years and are proud that the Police have always considered it a well-organised event.